The Talent Guide

Bringing your family

If you choose to bring your spouse and/or children to Stockholm, there are a few things to think about. 

Should your spouse wish to continue his or her career in Stockholm, there are a number of established agencies to approach. For more information see the Find a job-section.

Learn Swedish – cost-free 
Please note that Swedes are happy to speak English, but it could be hard to find a job if you don’t speak Swedish. There’s a cost-free course in Swedish for non-Swedes called SFI (Svenska För Invandrare or Swedish For Immigrants). We recommend you to contact SFI as soon as possible. Also see SIFA (Stockholm Intense Swedish for Academics) and Stockholm Academic Forum.

A very family friendly city
Stockholm is an excellent place to be a parent (or a child). To prove this point, the Swedish Institute has put together a list of “10 things that make Sweden family-friendly”.

Good to know
Children (like adults) need Personal identity numbers.

Work and residence permits for family members

EU/EEA citizens
Family members who are EU/EEA citizens can move to Stockholm without applying for any permit, but if you have family who are citizens of a country outside of the EU, they need to apply for a residence card. In order for your family to be granted residence cards you must be able to demonstrate that you can support yourself in Sweden through work, studies or with sufficient means.

For more information, please visit the website of the Swedish Migration Agency.

Non-EU citizens
If you obtain a permit to work in Stockholm, residence permits can be granted to members of your family for the same period of time. If you receive a permit for at least six months, members of your family can also obtain work permits.

If you have family who are citizens of a country outside of the EU, they need to apply for a residence card. In order for your family to be granted residence cards you must be able to demonstrate that you can support yourself in Sweden through work, studies or with sufficient means.

Family ties include spouses, common-law spouses, registered partners and unmarried children of you or your partner who are under 21.

For more information about the application process, please go to the website of the Swedish Migration Agency.

Childcare and schools

Childcare services are available for all children from one year of age, provided they have a Swedish personal identity number. Parents pay a fee linked to the family’s income and the child’s attendance. Contact your local municipality (kommun) for more information.

Almost all six-year-olds attend voluntary preschool classes. Between ages 7-16, children go to compulsory comprehensive school. After completing the ninth grade, 90 % continue with a three-year upper secondary school (gymnasium) with most programs leading to a vocational diploma and to qualifications for studies at a university or university college (högskola). All education provided by the state is free.

Contact your local municipality (kommun) or ‘stadsdelsförvaltning’ in Stockholm for more information about schools with other language profiles.

International schools in Stockholm
Stockholm has a number of international schools. Grow Internationals has gathered useful information and put together a list of international schools in Stockholm.

Parental leave

Sweden has one of the most generous parent leave (föräldraledighet) systems in the world. Parents are granted 480 days of leave per child, and 420 of these days are paid at a rate of 80% of your salary up to a limit of SEK 910 a day.

To qualify for basic benefits (180 SEK a day for 480 days) you need to be a legal resident of Sweden. It’s not your employer who covers the cost of your parent leave benefit but the Swedish Social Insurance Agency (Försäkringskassan).

Försäkringskassan offers more information on Parental leave.

Language you should be aware of:
Parental leave = föräldraledighet
Maternity leave = mammaledighet
Paternity leave = pappaledighet